Review: Science Comics Crows – Genius Birds

I have been a HUGE Science Comics fan since I laid my hands on my first one – which happened to be a hardcover of the Bat version. I loved it so much, I recommended it to the buyer at Powell’s PDX to help bulk up the nonfiction section in the kid’s room – which was SORELY lacking. We ended up getting new ones as they came out, and these fun and fascinating titles became one of the kid’s room top sellers – from the time we got our first copies, until the day the store closed due to COVID-19. I was particularly excited about the Crows edition coming out, because I think crows are pretty much just amazing. This book absolutely reinforces my excitement, both about the series, *and* about crows.

In this one, a crow releases a friendly, neighborhood dog from his yard and they go looking for delicious treats. Along the way, the crow explains: crow brains, food, tools, families, and more. Even for someone who knows a decent amount about crows, there was new information and neat facts about how crows learn, different tests they’ve taken part in, and their problem-solving skills.

It’s a fascinating look at these fascinating creatures that far too many see simply as pests. Crows, and other corvids, are truly unique in the bird world – and are much more like us than many understand. This book is a great way for humans of ALL ages to learn about them, and come to understand them just a little bit more.

The Science Comics as a whole are generally very well done, with a great balance between text and pictures. I’ve recommended them to people of all ages, FOR all ages – they’re excellent for beginning readers who can use the pictures to start understanding the words being read to them, all the way up to adults. Just about every employee at the store had their favorite one, and we’ve had adult customers purchase them for themselves based on their fields of study. I cannot recommend them enough, and the cool thing is that they tend to release about three a year, keeping readers excited for more. All libraries – school and city – should have copies of these excellent titles, and it’s a great way to get kids interested in nonfiction and leave them wanting to learn more!